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Mixed commentary and a pretty clutch montage re: censorship problems facing dating reality show “If You Are the One” (非诚勿扰). Streaming in via Jiangsu Satellite TV, that arc of glittered women held me through many a long night in Hong Kong. (via The New York Times - Breaking News, World News & Multimedia)

2 years ago
5 notes
Yang Fudong, ‘An Estranged Paradise’, 1997-2002, 35 mm B&W film, Image courtesy: ShanghART Gallery Yang Fudong, ‘An Estranged Paradise’, 1997-2002, 35 mm B&W film. Image courtesy ShanghART Gallery. (via Yang Fudong’s video installations a contemporary form of Chinese hand scrolls | Art Radar Asia)

Yang Fudong, ‘An Estranged Paradise’, 1997-2002, 35 mm B&W film, Image courtesy: ShanghART Gallery Yang Fudong, ‘An Estranged Paradise’, 1997-2002, 35 mm B&W film. Image courtesy ShanghART Gallery. (via Yang Fudong’s video installations a contemporary form of Chinese hand scrolls | Art Radar Asia)

2 years ago
2 notes
Andersen played the role of Chairman Mao, sitting for a fictitious interview. “Have you seen Godard’s La Chinoise?” asked Kreamer, playing his interlocutor. “Have you seen Dali’s Mao/Marilyn?” “Chairman Mao, perhaps I might ask your opinion on birth control.” Tuten himself, a septuagenarian in a black blazer, sat at the front of the room, beaming with happiness at the event held in his honor.
alicechiang:

Promotional posters for Taiwan, a country with lots of delicious food (It’s true!) and fun.
I chose four images in each poster: Boba milk tea, chopsticks, National Palace Museum, Taipei 101

alicechiang:

Promotional posters for Taiwan, a country with lots of delicious food (It’s true!) and fun.

I chose four images in each poster: Boba milk tea, chopsticks, National Palace Museum, Taipei 101

(via quirkytaiwan)

2 years ago
22 notes
“Imagine a kung fu flick in which the martial artists spout Situationist aphorisms about conquering alienation while decadent bureaucrats ply the ironies of a stalled revolution. This is what you’ll encounter in René Viénet’s’s outrageous refashioning of a Chinese fisticuff film. An influential Situationist, Viénet’s stripped the soundtrack from a run-of-the-mill Hong Kong export and lathered on his own devastating dialogue… . A brilliant, acerbic and riotous critique of the failure of socialism in which the martial artists counter ideological blows with theoretical thrusts from Debord, Reich and others… . Viénet’s’s target is also the mechanism of cinema and how it serves ideology.”
Program Note

Eh, mixed feelings. (via Handsome Furs)

2 years ago
4 notes
Academics have a term for this: “adaptive authoritarianism.” As Peter L. Lorentzen of the University of California, Berkeley, has written, officials view protests as way to gauge popular discontent. Small-scale protests function as a feedback mechanism for the government of a country without an active civil society or elections. Far from being a harbinger of regime change, Lorentzen argues that, in China at least, they can stabilize the regime.